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Field Notes

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Our original 48-page memo book available in four varieties.
Each book measures 3-1/2” wide by 5-1/2” tall and is bound with a rugged three-staple saddle-stitch process.

If you're sick of seeing Moleskines come out of everybody's pocket, feast your eyes on the rugged-looking Field Notes Memo Books ($10/3-pack). These soft-covered notebooks are filled with 48 pages of crisp graph paper, perfect for your to-do list or any of the "Practical Applications" suggested inside the back cover — such as Treasure Maps, Gambling Debts, and Half-Ass Calculations. The made-in-the-USA notebooks are the perfect fit for your back pocket, while the brown cover and old-school Futura type will make you look more like an adventurer than a follower.

Stenography, or “shorthand,” is a writing system designed to increase speed and/or space-efficiency, most often used in journalism, medical, legal, and business environments to transcribe the spoken word.

THE STENO is 6″ by 9″ with a black Double-O Wiring spiral at the top so it lies flat, open or closed. Inside you’ll find 80 pages of 70# “Bright White” paper Gregg-ruled with a fine, soy-based application of “Double Knee Duck Canvas” light brown ink. The covers are Newark Paperboard Mills 60 pt. “Super Duty Chipboard,” with a screen-printed 1-Color application of “Dictation Smudge” black ink.

The inside covers provide a range of useful information from the history of stenography and an abbreviations guide, to temperature conversions, planetary distances from the sun, a hobo symbol quick reference guide and more. Frankly, we wonder how we ever got by without one open on our desks at all times.

 

Expedition Limited Edition

“FNC-17″ marks the start of our fifth year of FIELD NOTES COLORS. In that time, we’ve explored a wide variety of papers, colors, and printing techniques, but with this new “EXPEDITION” edition, for the first time, we’ve actually expanded the basic utility of our notebooks.

Aesthetically, you’ll find an all-new design with plenty to like: a hi-visibility “Antarctic Survey Orange” front cover and “Polar Night Black” back cover, with a subtle varnish effect featuring a topographic map of Antarctica. The body pages feature our popular ‘dot grid’ graph paper, printed in light gray.

But the real innovation here is the paper. It’s maybe not even fair to call it paper. The whole book is printed on Yupo Synthetic paper, an amazing water- and tear-proof paper extruded from polypropylene pellets in Chesapeake, Virginia. We could go on and on about our new books’ durability and incredible properties (especially in concert with the new FN-19 Space Pen), and we will, in this series of 12 (reasonably) scientific tests:

 

Resolution

 

Our Seasonal Release for Winter is the “Resolution” Edition. It’s straightforward and useful, two very good things for a Field Notes product to be.

 

A pocket-sized weekly planner and a “to-do” book rank at the very top of the list of things people have asked us to make throughout the years. We paid attention, and put both together for our Winter release, to coincide with the busy holiday season and the start of a new year. It’s a fine time to become a more productive and organized you.

 

Each 3-Pack of Memo Books includes one 56-page Date Book and two 48-page Checklist Journals. (While supplies last, retail orders will include a two-sided 2018 Calendar that fits right inside the books.)

 

The covers are made from bright, beautiful Cyan, Red, and White 80#C Vellum paper from Mohawk, stamped with matte Crown foils.

 

The inside pages are a very light gray 60#T Domtar Earth Choice printed with white and medium gray inks. The Checklist Journals are subtly ruled with contrasting white/gray blocks and a “Slot Screw-Head Device” at the start of each line for marking completed and partially completed tasks. The Date Book displays one week on each page. Together, the two formats can be used in any number of ways as a complete and portable planning system. There’s no single “correct” system for filling in the “screw-heads,” we left it as flexible as possible, and we can’t wait to see how you use it.

 

“Utility” features your choice of two often-requested but rarely-available body pages: Engineer Graph or Ledger. Engineer Graph features an 1/8-inch grid with bolder lines each half-inch. It awaits your schematics, assembly drawings, geometry homework, or dungeon maps. The Ledger version, of course, is ultra-handy for mileage logs, parts lists, to-do lists, or any sort of handwritten accounting.

 

People often ask, “Where do your ideas come from?” In this case, it started with the cover paper. Mohawk’s beautiful vibrant Via Vellum 80# “Safety Yellow” cover jumped right out of the sample book like a DOT warning sign. It also brought to mind the yellow tape of a tape measure, which gave us another idea…

 

Utility IT MEASURES UP

 

After ten years of making (and using) our memo books, we’ve come to realize that the ruler on the inside of the back cover is one of Field Notes’ most frequently-used but least-acknowledged features. We’ve been known to tear off a back cover of a filled-up book just to have an accessible ruler on hand around the office, workbench, or printing press. For this edition, we designed a new flip-out ruler (inches on one side, centimeters on the other) that folds out of the back cover. Upon seeing our mockup, our printer said “it can’t be done! The binding machine will cut the ruler off!” Then they remembered they love doing things that “can’t be done” and figured it out: with the edge of the back cover indented  1/8" from the rest of the book, it worked like a charm.

 

Inside, you’ll find “Pure White” Mohawk Via Vellum 70# text stock. It’s ruled in an unobtrusive “Get-It-Done Gray,” with the aforementioned ledger lines or engineer grid. This vellum stock is heavy, toothy and can’t wait to meet your favorite pen or pencil. Three tough black staples hold the books together, and the outside corners are rounded to a 3/8" radius.

 

Drive in the Gap

 

CHAPTER ONE:

 

My first memory is of my father carrying a hammer into our bedrooms and smashing open our piggy banks on the night Roberto died.

 

I couldn’t have known what was happening. I didn’t know about the sputtering airplane, carrying one Major League superstar and too many supplies for earthquake victims in Nicaragua. But I might have understood what Roberto meant to my dad.

 

Three years earlier, as my father arrived for his first day on the job with the Pittsburgh Pirates, he had been intercepted by Dick Stockton in the parking lot of McKechnie Field, the Bucs’ spring training home in Bradenton, Florida. Stockton is a first-tier play-by-play announcer now, but in 1970 he was a Pittsburgh television sports anchor, and he asked if Dad was the team’s new public relations director. When my father said he was, Stockton said he would like an interview with Roberto Clemente. My father explained he’d only been on the job a few minutes, and that he hadn’t even met Clemente yet. Nevertheless, he would see what he could do.

 

My dad has Alzheimer’s now so I can’t ask him what happened next, but when his memories were still present he took out a yellow legal pad and wrote down many of his baseball stories. In these pages he describes his first encounter with Roberto. Dad introduced himself as the new PR guy, and in the next breath asked if Clemente would do an interview with the sports director from KDKA-TV.

 

Roberto reacted with a three or four minute outburst, combining English and Spanish, to let me know exactly how he felt about Stockton. Apparently he and Dick had had a falling-out some time ago over something Stockton had said on the air.

 

Then Roberto paused, regained his composure, and looked at me with a little smile. “Would it help you if I did the interview?” he asked.

 

“Well, it’s my first day on the job and I’m trying to get off on the right foot,” I said. “Yes, it would help me if you would talk to him.”

 

Clemente nodded and said, “Ok. For you I will do it, my friend.” He finished dressing, walked out on the field, and gave an interview to Dick Stockton for the first time in years.

 

That night in my bedroom, early in the morning on New Year’s Day, 1973, I don’t think my dad had words for what he was feeling. He’d just finished a call with Joe Brown, the Pirates’ general manager. In his grief, Joe didn’t hang up the phone on his end, which, in the context of early seventies telecommunications, meant our home phone was disconnected. So Dad poured change from his kids’ banks into an old sock that he would carry, along with his little green address book, a mile through the cold and snow to a parking lot pay phone outside a general store, and from there he would tell the world that his friend Roberto was dead.



 

 

 

 

A Drive into the Gap is a true story about fathers and sons, baseball and memory, and the improbable journey of a bat from one of the most iconic moments in the history of the game to the bedroom of a 12-year-old boy.